Archive for Hefeweizen

58 – Erdinger Oktoberfest Weizen

This is the 2nd of a series since we’re in an interesting season for craft beer. Starting last week I will be reviewing a series of oktoberfest/harvest/bocks followed by 3 weeks of pumpkin beers. If you’ve drank with me before you know what I think of the pumpkin style.  Some were good while others still sucked the soul from my palate. Game ON!

Erdinger Oktoberfest Weizen
brewery:
Erdinger – http://www.erdinger.de/
style: Hefeweizen
abv: 5.6%
serving size: 12oz
glass used: pint
price: $3.25

Overview
Erdinger is brewed all-naturally, using traditional bottle-fermentation, never pasteurized.

What I think
I haven ever had an Oktoberfest Hefe before so I wasn’t sure what to expect. I’ve had both styles before but this was the first where they were mixed and it was quite the trip. First off it had a hazy body which is typical of many hefeweizens that I’ve tried but the amberish tint made me curious as to how these styles would blend. The head was very fluffy and hung around for a while so expect to get a white tipped nose when you tip it back. The aroma on it was a bit mixed. First I picked up a strong wheat followed by a touch of orange. The taste was somewhere between light and medium mouthfeel and once the malt settled in I could tell this was a winner. The finish was smooth but didn’t finish as crisp as I was expecting. Overall worth a try and ranks better than most oktoberfest beers I’ve had this season.

Spoon’s rating: B

Imperial Stouts are generally known as Winter beers.  Because of their high alcohol content (in this case, 9.5% ABV), they tend to lay heavy on your tongue which some find less palatable in warmer seasons such as this.  But this beer doesn’t do that. It’s lush, yes — rich with malt and chocolate and slight hints of vanilla. With such a sweet overall balance of malt, it almost seems that the hops play a very minor role in the overall flavor of the beer. Even the roasted barley, one of the most integral ingredients of any Stout, doesn’t take over.  Ten Fidy almost seems like a beer that doesn’t take itself seriously, when it should. It couldn’t be less assuming. It is in a can, after all.Don’t judge this beer by its appearance in its package. Because once it’s in your glass, it’s a whole new ball game. Available coast to coast.  http://www.oskarblues.com/locations/

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